Helen Lewis

Selected journalism, links and contact information from @helenlewis

Talking on the Today programme about why every politician can learn from Star Trek. 
(Side note: when did the cast of TNG all go to a high-school prom together? LOOK AT THE VELOUR SHEET.)

Talking on the Today programme about why every politician can learn from Star Trek. 

(Side note: when did the cast of TNG all go to a high-school prom together? LOOK AT THE VELOUR SHEET.)

“Our national symbol shouldn’t be the bulldog; it should be a scrappy mutt, with a wonky smile and one slightly nibbled ear.”
- On Britishness, for Hunger Magazine

“There is an unavoidably gendered aspect to our ideas of what constitutes “real work”, even though you’d be hard-pressed to argue that a screaming toddler is the easy option compared with piddling round on Microsoft Excel.”

—   My review of Overwhelmed, by Brigid Schulte. Contains the phrase “desk meat”, which I hope will catch on.

Miniature CV

Helen Lewis is deputy editor at the New Statesman, a British left-leaning political magazine. 

As well as commissioning and editing, she writes for the NS magazine and blogs for its website, with favoured topics including comedy, feminism, politics and computer games. She has also written for Edge magazine, British Elle, the New York Times, the Stylist, the Financial TimesStella, the Sunday Times, Saga, the Observer and the Guardianand has appeared on the Today programme, Pienaar’s PoliticsWoman’s Hour, Boulton & Co, Channel 4 News, Westminster Hour, BBC Breakfast and The Daily Politics. She is a regular panellist on BBC One’s Sunday Politics

She has a first class degree in English Language and Literature from Oxford University and an MA (Distinction) in English Literature from the Open University. In her spare time, she is deputy chair of Women in Journalism, and chair of trustees at the Hackney-based rape and domestic violence charity, Nia

She tweets @helenlewis and her New Statesman blog can be found here.

What this Tumblr needed was more Chris Cook being rogueish.

What this Tumblr needed was more Chris Cook being rogueish.

“The lie that social media sells us is that we can be better understood, if only we expose more of ourselves, and expend more words in the attempt.”

The Olivier stage at the National Theatre is a vast, hulking thing. There’s none of your poky, filigreed, rococo West End nonsense here: this space has drama all of its own.
- my review of Simon Russell Beale in King Lear
I’ll be talking to games writer Rhianna Pratchett about games and storytelling at the Stratford Literary Festival (5pm, 3 May). It’s £8, but you do get TEA. And CAKE. 

I’ll be talking to games writer Rhianna Pratchett about games and storytelling at the Stratford Literary Festival (5pm, 3 May). It’s £8, but you do get TEA. And CAKE. 

“With his “A list” of candidates, Mr Cameron has already tried to break the stranglehold of his grass roots. But if he truly wants change, there is only one answer. He must impose long-promised all-women shortlists, despite the howls of anguish they will provoke. He must do so in the knowledge they are illiberal and prone to manipulation – but they also work. The number of female MPs doubled at the 1997 election, thanks to Labour adopting the system; the opposition is now 31 per cent women, with 14 in the shadow cabinet. Mr Cameron should assure his party that all-women shortlists will only be a temporary measure. To misquote Thatcher, they are the method – the object is to change the soul.”

—   

For the FT on why the Tories should impose all-women shortlists if they really want to solve their “women problem”*. (subscription required)

* I wanted the final line to be a “Downton Abbey party in a Gogglebox world” but the FT reasonably pointed out their international readers wouldn’t have a clue what I was on about. 

Talking about the Future of Journalism at the Frontline club with the Guardian’s Merope Mills, Buzzfeed’s Luke Lewis and Mail Online’s Pete Picton. (Write up by The Media Briefing here)

Mimophant: ”A phenomenon most of us have met in life: a hybrid who combines the delicate frailness of the Mimosa, crumbling at a touch when his own feelings are hurt, with the thick-skinned robustness of the elephant trampling over the feelings of others.”

- from Khushwant Singh’s The End of India - which spells it “momiophant”. The original coinage is by Arthur Koestler, where it’s “mimophant”. He coined it in 1963, but it’s the perfect word for the internet age. 

"Germaine Greer is feminism’s arsonist … she is a stimulant, not a painkiller."
Writing for the Observer on the feminist icon’s 75th birthday.

"Germaine Greer is feminism’s arsonist … she is a stimulant, not a painkiller."

Writing for the Observer on the feminist icon’s 75th birthday.

I have a little piece in February’s Elle magazine, imagining what the blurb would be for my autobiography. Decided it would be called It Was All Quite Pleasant, Really.

I have a little piece in February’s Elle magazine, imagining what the blurb would be for my autobiography. Decided it would be called It Was All Quite Pleasant, Really.

Who was better as a Shakespearean hero - Loki from Avengers, Doctor Who or Alfie? I saw Tom Hiddleston’s Coriolanus, David Tennant’s Richard II and Jude Law’s Henry V. One stood out… but which one was it?
The future of feminism explained, through photos from Buffy.