Helen Lewis

Journalism, links and contact information from @helenlewis.

Remembering Emma Humphreys

A post by Karen Ingala Smith on the work done by Nia, the Hackney-based violence against women charity that I chair. 

The end of subtweeting: on Twitter etiquette, civil inattention and why we have to talk behind each other’s backs.
From Sojourner Truth to Helen Forrester (above), a few reading recommendations for the young feminist in YOUR life. 
“So there I was, engorged with hate, and I hadn’t even opened the book yet.”
- my Guardian review of Sophia Amoruso’s #GIRLBOSS

So there I was, engorged with hate, and I hadn’t even opened the book yet.”

- my Guardian review of Sophia Amoruso’s #GIRLBOSS

“The real solution to our housing crisis is equally simple and equally impossible: build more houses. Politicians have cottoned on to this in the abstract, but they are more reluctant to be drawn on where these houses should be. That’s because homes need to be in places where people want to live and that means the green belt.”

Miniature CV

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Helen Lewis is deputy editor at the New Statesman, a British left-leaning political magazine. 

As well as commissioning and editing, she writes for the NS magazine and blogs for its website, with favoured topics including comedy, feminism, politics and computer games. She has also written for Edge magazine, British Elle, the New York Times, the Stylist, the Financial TimesStella, the Sunday Times, Saga, the Observer, the Times and the Guardianand has appeared on the Today programme, Pienaar’s PoliticsWoman’s Hour, Boulton & Co, Channel 4 News, Westminster Hour, BBC Breakfast and The Daily Politics. She is a regular panellist on BBC One’s Sunday Politics and has presented Radio 4’s The Week in Westminster. 

She has a first class degree in English Language and Literature from Oxford University and an MA (Distinction) in English Literature from the Open University. In her spare time, she is deputy chair of Women in Journalism, and chair of trustees at the Hackney-based rape and domestic violence charity, Nia

She tweets @helenlewis and her New Statesman blog can be found here.

"The first time Jean Paul Gaultier showed a collection that included men’s skirts, the staff of Vogue walked out, swiftly followed by those of Marie Claire and French Elle. In his notes for the Barbican’s retrospective, Gaultier archly observes: ‘I was slated by the French press for designing clothes for hairdressers and homosexuals! It took them two years to accept my statement that Prince Charles is not the only real man to wear a skirt!’”

(reviewing the Jean Paul Gaultier exhibition at the Barbican)

In Outliers, Malcolm Gladwell attributes part of Bill Gates’s success to having been born at the right time to take advantage of the Altair 8800, an early do-it-yourself computer kit. The popularity of Minecraft offers the same sort of opportunity to today’s children: the next Frank Gehry or Zaha Hadid is probably building their own private city somewhere in its landscape right now, block by block.

 (On Minecraft in the FT, registration required)
I hosted the Radio 4’s Week in Westminster on 10 May, talking about rail privatisation, black and Asian voters, the Northern Ireland peace process and how to tackle inequality.
Talking on the Today programme about why every politician can learn from Star Trek. 
(Side note: when did the cast of TNG all go to a high-school prom together? LOOK AT THE VELOUR SHEET.)

Talking on the Today programme about why every politician can learn from Star Trek. 

(Side note: when did the cast of TNG all go to a high-school prom together? LOOK AT THE VELOUR SHEET.)

“Our national symbol shouldn’t be the bulldog; it should be a scrappy mutt, with a wonky smile and one slightly nibbled ear.”
- On Britishness, for Hunger Magazine

“There is an unavoidably gendered aspect to our ideas of what constitutes “real work”, even though you’d be hard-pressed to argue that a screaming toddler is the easy option compared with piddling round on Microsoft Excel.”

—   My review of Overwhelmed, by Brigid Schulte. Contains the phrase “desk meat”, which I hope will catch on.
What this Tumblr needed was more Chris Cook being rogueish.

What this Tumblr needed was more Chris Cook being rogueish.

“The lie that social media sells us is that we can be better understood, if only we expose more of ourselves, and expend more words in the attempt.”

The Olivier stage at the National Theatre is a vast, hulking thing. There’s none of your poky, filigreed, rococo West End nonsense here: this space has drama all of its own.
- my review of Simon Russell Beale in King Lear